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Roger Raffini Phones & Addresses

  • Georgetown, CT
  • Southport, CT
  • Wilton, CT
  • New Haven, CT
  • Bridgeport, CT
  • PO Box 692, Georgetown, CT 06829

Work

Position: Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations

Education

Degree: Graduate or professional degree

Publications

Us Patents

Child Resistant Tube Latch

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US Patent:
56719574, Sep 30, 1997
Filed:
Dec 14, 1995
Appl. No.:
8/572713
Inventors:
Roger Raffini - Georgetown CT
International Classification:
E05C 502
US Classification:
292 62
Abstract:
A child safety latch which cannot be actuated by those having relatively short fingers. A spring-biased lock is slidably moved within the J-shaped tracks of a guard tube. The latch is in an unlocked position when the locking pin rests in the larger side of the J-shaped track. In this position, the spring biases the locking pin against the top of the larger side of the track. Actuation of the latch, i. e. pushing down on the button located on top of the lock, lowers the lock against the spring. The complete lowering of the lock and the full compression of the spring occurs when the locking pin is at the bottom of the J-shaped track. A slight counter-clockwise twist of the finger urges the locking pin into the smaller side of the J-shaped track, where the lock is spring biased against the top of the smaller side. Thus, the lock is in a locked position and can only be opened by someone having fingers long enough to reach into the tube and to disengage the lock, by depressing the actuation means and rotating it in a clockwise direction.

Child Seat Protection Device

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US Patent:
55561624, Sep 17, 1996
Filed:
Sep 5, 1995
Appl. No.:
8/523468
Inventors:
Roger A. Raffini - Georgetown CT
International Classification:
A47C 108
US Classification:
29725615
Abstract:
A portable framework providing protection to a space surrounding a seat for an infant. The framework extends in all directions beyond a child situated in the seat to prevent threats from impacting the child directly. The seat may be conveniently mounted within the framework. The framework may then be easily placed in an automobile seat so that the seat may be used as a car seat. Alternatively, the framework may be connected to a stroller chassis to form a carriage. The framework is formed of a number of lightweight strong bars arranged at angles and with curves to cause potential hazards to be easily deflected from the structure. The framework includes a front portion which pivots to assist in introducing and removing a child from the seat.
Roger A Raffini from Georgetown, CT, age ~63 Get Report